THE HEBREW MONTH OF NISAN 2020 (Part 1)

 

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I originally began studying the Hebrew calendar with reference to Biblical events many years ago and have written several papers and studies concerning them. The following post begins the republishing of a series of posts I first made in 2012 and then again in 2014. I have done some major updating and also installed the correct dates for this year. Though the spring feasts have been fulfilled, it does not mean these dates do not have current significance. I encourage you to continue studying God’s calendar on your own, and see how this time of year might be applied to a new beginning in your own life.

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THE MONTH OF NISAN

According to the ancient lunar-solar Hebrew calendar of modern Rabbinic Judaism, Yesterday, March 26 was the first day of the month of Nisan. Historically, this is a very important month and, coinciding with the season of spring, denotes a new beginning.

Nisan is the first month of the festival, or ecclesiastical year.

It is most often the seventh month of the civil year.

In an intercalary year, when there are thirteen months instead of twelve, it is the eighth month.

The name Nisan is Babylonian, and was named during the 70 year captivity in Babylon in the sixth century BC. In the Old Testament, in the Torah, this month was originally known as Abib (or Aviv) in most Bible versions. The word Abib means, “fresh, young barley ears,” and refers to the time of the year when the barley first becomes ripe.

Each Hebrew month begins and ends with the new moon. But because the official rabbinic calendar is predetermined, technical problems arise. The calendar is not dynamic but fixed to allow for the setting of dates decades or even centuries in advance.

For example, the actual new moon which began the current lunar month took place in the USA this past Tuesday morning, March 24, at 4:28 Central Daylight Time.

However, the official Hebrew calendar did not start the new month of Nisan until Wednesday, March 25 at sunset. This is in part because Hebrew days always begin at evening, in keeping with the account in Genesis 1:5: “And there was evening and there was morning, one day.” This is also due to the static nature of the Hebrew calendar, in that the month should have actually began a day earlier.

So, technically, Nisan 1 began in the USA on Tuesday, March 24 at sunset. You’ll have to check your own lunar cycle wherever you may live in the world to discover when Nisan 1 began in your area.

The following list of dates includes the happenings of this time of year in relation to the days of the ancient calendar of the Hebrews. Since God’s original calendar remains in effect, these days are very important. Each feast day carries prophetic overtones. The spring feasts were all fulfilled two-thousand years ago when Messiah Jesus arrived as our Sacrifice Lamb and Redeemer.

To eliminate confusion, the listed dates are according to the official rabbinic calendar.

Regarding the month of Nisan:

Now the LORD said to Moses and Aaron in the land of Egypt, “This month shall be the beginning of months for you; it is to be the first month of the year to you.” [Exodus 12:1-2]

There are several significant events in Biblical history that took place on Nisan 1, the above passage of Scripture being one of them. God still pays close attention to His calendar and His timing for personal events in our lives often involves calendar dates. Many of us are feeling a new spiritual beginning of some sort at this time. What follows is a sampling of important dates to orient us to the beginning of this new season.

Nisan 1 / March 26, 2020 Thursday (Began at sunset on March 25):

It was on this date that the Mishkan was set up for the first time:

Now in the first month of the second year, on the first day of the month, the tabernacle was erected. [Exodus 40:17]

The nation of Israel had left Egypt after the first Passover almost one full year before this event. The people had been in the Sinai since the Exodus from Egypt, and because of their lack of faith, they denied themselves entry into the Promised Land many months before and were destined to wander in the desert a full forty years. In that time the design was revealed, and the elements needed for the tabernacle were built, including the Ark of the Covenant. It was on this date that the tabernacle in the wilderness was set up for the first time in its history.

This is indicative of a new spiritual start and a new beginning. It is indicative of the beginning of a new ministry. Since the Great Awakening in America is on course, though in the early stages, the beginning of a new chapter is undoubtedly taking place now. We are in transition to a greater fulfilling of this process, and individual believers are sensing this in their own lives and walking it out. Many are feeling a strong tug on their hearts to get closer to the Lord, whatever that may involve.

The next section is dedicated to two different eras: (1) The nation of Israel entering into the Promised Land for the first time thirty-nine years after the Mishkan was erected in the Sinai, and (2) The events of Passion Week almost fifteen hundred years later.

The Mishkan had repeatedly been set up for ministry and taken down in various locations as the nation of Israel traveled about the Sinai. At the end of their wanderings, Israel stood at the precipice of destiny. The prophecy was about to be fulfilled. They were now on the threshold of entering the Promised Land forty years after leaving Egypt, and would soon partake of their first Passover in the new land.

Notice the similarity of events when compared to Passion Week, to be discussed in Parts 2 and 3, when our Lord first entered Jerusalem as the officially recognized and honored Messiah. Is there any doubt that God creates new beginnings and fulfills prophecy on a specific timetable according to certain dates?

Nisan 7 / April 1, 2020 Wednesday (Begins at sunset on March 31):

While the nation of Israel was camped on the eastern side of the Jordan, two spies, or scouts, were sent out by Joshua across the Jordan River to Jericho to gather intelligence for the first battle in the conquest for the Promised Land.

Then Joshua commanded the officers of the people, saying, “Pass through the midst of the camp and command the people, saying, ‘Prepare provisions for yourselves, for within three days you are to cross this Jordan, to go in to possess the land which the LORD your God is giving you, to possess it.’” [Joshua 1:10-11]

Then Joshua the son of Nun sent two men as spies secretly from Shittim, saying, “Go, view the land, especially Jericho.” So they went and came into the house of a harlot whose name was Rahab, and lodged there. [Joshua 2:1] [1]

© 2020 by RJ Dawson. All Rights Reserved.


[1] Unless otherwise noted all Scriptures are taken from the New American Standard Bible, © 1960, 1963, 1968, 1971, 1972, 1973, 1975, 1977, 1995 by The Lockman Foundation. Used by permission.

Posted on March 27, 2020, in Current Events and tagged , , , , , , , , , . Bookmark the permalink. 10 Comments.

  1. I love this kind of info, and look forward to the rest of these posts.

    Your picture put me in mind of the reproduction of the Tabernacle in Lancaster, PA. If you’ve never seen it, you should! Not that it should be the only reason for you to be in my state, but it really is worth seeing. They’ve done an excellent job, staying as close to scriptural dimensions as they could. They even have the High Priest in all his finery to do the narration.

    I read somewhere recently that this will be the first time in over 2000 years that a lamb will be sacrificed in Jerusalem for Passover. Is this true? Do you know anything about it? I’m guessing that it’s because Jerusalem is once again the capitol, but can’t remember if that’s actually the reason.

    Like

    • Yeah, I think I heard about that. It only reinforces the fact that most Jews are still in a state of rejection or apathy toward the Messiah. The bigger problem is millions of confused Christians unclear on New Covenant teachings who support them. For example, we keep hearing that a perfect red heifer has been found or that the temple will be rebuilt. Real Christians know the sacrificial system ceased with the Lord’s perfect sacrifice of Himself and then rendered impossible when the temple was destroyed in AD 70, upon which the sacrificial system was based. There is no need for another temple or sacrifices or red heifers or sacrificial lambs. Whoever supports the rebuilding of another temple is in rebellion toward the Lord Jesus.

      As you know, the tabernacle is filled with spiritual portents and allegories illustrating the Lord, His ministry, and prophecy. That’s a great thing you have going up there. I know others do it as well. It helps tremendously to see and experience an actual replica faithful to the original design. It’s all right there in the Word.

      I appreciate that you like this information. I was studying something else and suddenly realized where we were and thought it would be a good idea to post this. It’s a four part series and I will be posting each relative to the date, so look for the next one in about a week.

      Thanks Linda. Blessings to you.

      Liked by 1 person

  2. thank you RJ! this is so good!
    Now we are the spiritual tabernacle of God in Christ and Christ in us! Jesus tore down the external temple in 70 AD, the year of our Lord, and rebuilt it in three days in His Body and now we come through the torn Veil, through the flesh of Jesus’ broken body to enter Christ’s Spiritual Body, raising us with Him, as the new tabernacles of God in Christ and Christ in us! internal, no longer external; spiritual, not literal, and a matter of the heart! O how I love the Word and the Spirit of God! blessings, Yvonne

    Liked by 1 person

  3. One thing my precept study group enjoys is the importance of the feasts and their meanings. God never ceases to amaze us with His wisdom.

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  4. Welcome to the family and God Bless

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