IF YOU’RE WONDERING WHEN THIS EVIL WILL END… (3)

We live in a finite and temporary world. These two facts portend that evil will achieve a point of allowed maximum growth and will then be terminated.

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I wrote in Part 1 of this series that Sin is Progressive. According to the dictionary definition, this means it is “moving forward or onward: advancing,” and “increasing in extent or severity.” [1]

The Word of God states that sin had a clear starting point in this world. There was a time here when there was no sin. The first two human beings on the planet initially existed in a state of pure innocence. They had no experiential concept of sin. Adam was certainly warned of it and Adam warned Eve of it. He taught her what God had taught him. But they only knew sin as a concept. The only thing that continued to protect them from it was their faith in God and obedience toward Him. More than these, though, it was Adam and Eve’s great love for God that compelled them to obey. Their love generated trust. They believed God and believed in Him.

This love was more pronounced in Adam, however. There was a period of time in Adam’s early life when he was blessed with much alone time and fellowship with God. Their Father-son relationship was undoubtedly very close. Eve never experienced this. It appears as though Eve spent little or no time as God’s daughter apart from Adam. She was created to be Adam’s wife. This created a dynamic that demanded even greater attention to their relationship with God. Just as we do not know how long Adam spent alone with God before Eve was created, we also don’t know how long Adam and Eve existed in innocence before they sinned. It would appear, though, that it was a relatively short rather than long period of time regarding the latter.

ADAM’S EZER KANEGDO

God stated: “It is not good for the man to be alone; I will make him a helper suitable for him.” (Genesis 2:18). The Hebrew word for good in this verse is defined as “pleasant, agreeable, good.” [2] It was not good that something not good existed in the Garden. It is my belief that this “not good” only lasted a short time. I explain it this way: God created Adam and breathed His own life-giving Spirit into him. Adam became a living being. His first relationship was that of a son to his Father (See Luke 3:38). We do not know at what age Adam was created but it was likely young enough for God to be a good Father to him and teach him all he must know. When the time came for Adam to seek a wife he entered into the “not good” phase. Adam arrived at a time when he needed close human companionship beyond his perfect companionship with God. His need denoted lack. The lack was “not good.” It was initially not good because there was no such helper suitable for him. She had yet to exist in all of Creation. God would have to create her. God knew He must create Adam’s ezer kanegdo. And it appears as though God saved His best for last.

It was up to Adam to teach her. He had to show her the ropes. Adam had the best Father and Teacher possible but now he would have to step into this role for Eve. It appears as though he did a very good job because we later see that Eve was well-versed in spiritual knowledge when she had her fateful conversation with the trickster serpent. She held up very well for a while. The serpent knew her every weakness, however, and took full advantage. There is no doubt that Eve wanted more than she had. She apparently did not understand fully that she already had it all. Her desire for more, wherever it came from, is what caused her to listen attentively to the serpent’s counter attack.

Remember, God had commanded Adam that he must never eat the fruit from one particular tree in the Garden. That was it. Just one thing he must never do. Only one negative command. Adam always obeyed. He taught Eve exactly as he had been taught. She undoubtedly knew the command. But whereas Adam had no longing for the forbidden fruit Eve apparently did. Adam did not think he was missing out but Eve apparently did. There can be no doubt that Adam had been tempted this way, maybe several times, all without giving in to temptation. What happened to Eve?

For starters Adam had somehow allowed her to be alone with the serpent. Even though Scripture seems to report that Adam was with her during the temptation this could not have been true. The words “with her” in Genesis 3:6 do not appear in the Hebrew. The conversation only involved Eve and the serpent. Though she had always obeyed up to that point, she did so because she feared death. She knew death was the penalty for violating the one negative command.

The first thing the serpent did to throw her off was ask her directly if God had ever actually made such a command. Eve said He did. She also told the serpent that whoever ate the forbidden fruit or even touched it would die. Adam had taught her this. But again, it appears as though God taught Adam better than Adam taught Eve. It looks as though Adam respected God more than Eve respected Adam. Adam had full confidence in God but Eve apparently did not have the same confidence in Adam. She must have questioned this command in her heart. This could be because she essentially got the message second hand. Because Adam was the go-between and because Eve never heard this directly from God she possessed a weakness the serpent could take advantage of.

(1) The serpent asked her if God had actually ever made that particular command. This put doubt in her mind. This pretty much proves that she never heard the command from God.

(2) When Eve told the serpent the command and the penalty for breaking it the serpent simply lied to her. She had never heard a lie before. The serpent told her, “You surely will not die!” Then he lied to her again and told her if she ate it she would be like God.

(3) Eve was now disarmed. She was no longer sure that God had ever made the command and then began believing that if God did make it He only did it because He wanted to keep her down. She must have thought God was holding out on her, that He did not want her to be fully blessed and fulfilled. She also probably thought that Adam had gone along with the ruse. How could someone so blessed living in Paradise actually think that the two most important ones in her life who both loved her were actually lying to her and holding out on her?

(4) Then the devil went in for the kill. He had managed to get her completely confused and off-balance. She could no longer properly discern the veracity of God’s command or the penalty thereof. Was it actually true? Is there something much better for me that I didn’t know about before?

She eventually succumbed to temptation.

THE THREE SOURCES OF SIN

In the first epistle of John the apostle, he warns his readers to “not love the world nor the things in the world.” The Greek word is kosmos and there are several definitions. In this context John is referring to the world of sinful man existing apart from God in opposition to Him containing “the whole circle of earthly goods, endowments, riches, advantages, pleasures, etc, which although hollow and frail and fleeting, stir desire, seduce from God and are obstacles to the cause of Christ.” [3] John then tells us that all sin originates from only three main sources:

Do not love the world nor the things in the world. If anyone loves the world, the love of the Father is not in him. For all that is in the world, the lust of the flesh and the lust of the eyes and the boastful pride of life, is not from the Father, but is from the world. The world is passing away, and also its lusts; but the one who does the will of God lives forever. [1John 2:15-17]

These three sources of sin are aligned with the three main temptations to sin. We may call them Door #1, Door #2, and Door #3. The three sources are three portals. The portals are presented by the enemy as Portals to Paradise. Whoever may enter through these doors is guaranteed to experience a paradise on earth. One is also promised a place of ruling authority. One can have whatever one’s heart desires. This should sound familiar:

When the woman saw that the tree was good for food, and that it was a delight to the eyes, and that the tree was desirable to make one wise, she took from its fruit and ate; and she gave also to her husband with her, and he ate. [Genesis 3:6][4]

Here we have the lust of the flesh, the lust of the eyes, and lastly, the boastful pride of life in which “your eyes will be opened, and you will be like God, knowing good and evil” (Genesis 3:5).

The Lord Jesus Himself had to be tempted with these three and pass the test before He could start His ministry. He succeeded where Adam failed. But it must be remembered that Adam and Eve repented of their great sin and got their act together with God 130 years later. They produced a righteous son named Seth, a replacement for righteous Abel who was murdered. Abel was the original beginning of the Messiah’s generational line. Adam started the line anew through Seth (See Genesis 4:25).

This tells us that any and all sin, no matter how heinous or egregious (except the unpardonable sin), even that as far-reaching as the sin of Adam and Eve, can be forgiven and washed away by the Blood of the Lamb. But this only happens if one exits “the world.” Adam and Eve were banished from the Garden and cast into the wild world. Everyone since was physically born into “the world.” In a reversal of fates, the last Adam makes it possible “for whosoever will” to exit the world of sin and enter the Kingdom of God on earth.

Nevertheless, the world of sin, since it was created many millennia ago, has grown worse and worse over time. It is because Sin is Progressive. It will continue progressing until it maxes out. We will look into this process further in Part 4…

© 2022 by RJ Dawson. All Rights Reserved. [To Be Continued]


[1] © 2022 Merriam-Webster, Incorporated

[2] Strong’s Concordance

[3] Strong’s Concordance

[4] Unless otherwise noted all Scriptures are taken from the New American Standard Bible, © 1960, 1963, 1968, 1971, 1972, 1973, 1975, 1977, 1995 by The Lockman Foundation. Used by permission.

IF YOU’RE WONDERING WHEN THIS EVIL WILL END… (1)

IF YOU’RE WONDERING WHEN THIS EVIL WILL END… (2)

IF YOU’RE WONDERING WHEN THIS EVIL WILL END… (4)

IF YOU’RE WONDERING WHEN THIS EVIL WILL END… (5)

IF YOU’RE WONDERING WHEN THIS EVIL WILL END… (6)

IF YOU’RE WONDERING WHEN THIS EVIL WILL END… (7)

IF YOU’RE WONDERING WHEN THIS EVIL WILL END… (8)

IF YOU’RE WONDERING WHEN THIS EVIL WILL END… (9)

Posted on February 17, 2022, in Teaching and tagged , , , , , , , , , , , . Bookmark the permalink. 10 Comments.

  1. If Adam didn’t think he was missing out, why would he eat the fruit too? It seems he trusted his wife and the serpent’s twisted logic more than God. They both doubted God otherwise Adam would have obeyed and not eaten the fruit.

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    • Thanks Amber. I’m glad you caught that. The relationship dynamic was such that Adam’s relationship with God had gotten compromised by his relationship with Eve, unnecessarily so, of course. Adam was never deceived by the serpent. Eve was. After losing out in her conversation with the serpent and succumbing to temptation, Eve convinced Adam to also eat the fruit. He did so not because he thought he was missing out with God or doubted Him and not because he was deceived by the serpent, but because he loved Eve and could not fathom being apart from her.

      In the brief interval when Eve had already sinned and he had yet to, Adam was faced with an extremely difficult choice (understatement alert). He could choose God, continue to never sin, maintain his spiritual state of innocence and the great power and authority thereof, and refuse to eat the fruit. This would mean only Eve would be banished from the Garden. Or he could choose Eve.

      Rather than obey God he obeyed his wife. He decided he would rather sin and be apart from God so he could be with Eve, since he could no longer be with both. He decided that life in the perfect Garden where there was no sin and where he could maintain his close relationship with God, but without Eve, would be unbearable. He no longer cared about the evil he would be passing on to humanity from that point forward. He completely rejected the big picture. He decided he could never kick Eve out of the Garden, which is what he would have had to do.

      He chose his love of Eve over his love for God. He chose Eve over God. Eve was the first sinner. But it can easily be argued that Adam’s sin was much greater.

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      • Thanks for the clarification, much appreciated. If Adam loved Eve and made his decision by putting her first before obeying God, isn’t that doubting God? If he put her before God, then wasn’t he deceived in his thinking? Adam was tempted in a different way than she was after his spouse had already eaten the forbidden fruit, but he still sinned by doubting God and acting on his belief that he couldn’t live without Eve.

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        • I do not necessarily disagree. You make excellent points. It certainly appears that Adam was deceived in his thinking. It may be perceived that Adam doubted God in the sense that Eve added a relationship dynamic in which Adam might have thought God didn’t think through, as ridiculous as that would be. Maybe Adam thought it would be too difficult to maintain an excellent relationship with both, that one or the other relationship would always suffer from time to time. Adam certainly appears to have given up when he ate the fruit, possibly believing that what God had created and desired simply would not work. Maybe Eve had essentially disarmed him, whether meaning to or not. Maybe Adam had a case of temporary insanity and thought he actually would not die and that eating the fruit would somehow be very good for him and Eve.

          I know there is much speculation in this discussion but one is forced to read between the lines because there is so little narrative. God presents the basic facts. I believe He expects us to figure it out, and that demands speculation within the process of gaining greater truth. There is a powerful lesson in this narrative that every Christian must know, learn, and apply.

          Thanks again Amber. Blessings

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          • Thanks so much for the reply. I will look over all this again- gave me a lot to think about today and I appreciate reading and diving deeper into God’s Word. God bless!

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          • Thinking on this more- Adam still has to take responsibility for his actions and cannot blame them on someone else. This is what a narcissist does- it’s never their fault it’s always because of someone else that they did wrong. We can’t blame our actions on what others did or did not do. He is his own person, and if he truly had no doubts and was set on following God, He would have trusted God over his wife. Romans 5:12 highlights more of this in that sin entered the world through the first man.

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            • Yes. If Adam had remained spiritually strong and “set on following God,” he would not have made such an infinitely bad decision. He was certainly responsible for what he did and so was Eve. Looking at it closer, as I’ve reiterated, there was a new relationship dynamic in play. Adam was going to have to continue in his strong walk with God and maintain that relationship while he also maintained a good relationship with his new ezer kenegdo. By the way, the language does not do this term justice, as “helper suitable for him” (Genesis 2:18, 20) or “help meet,” while technically correct, does not relay the fullness of who Eve was created to be. She was actually a strong ally standing with him, to bless him with strength and support, in a way only she could. There are good available studies on this term to explain it further.

              What happened, however, was that Adam drifted in his walk with God which made him susceptible and vulnerable to temptation and deception. Adam and Eve also had drifted in their own relationship because Eve should never have been alone with the serpent. She either did this against Adam in that she purposefully stepped out on her own, maybe for the worst of reasons, or he allowed it because he wasn’t watching over her and protecting her as he should have.

              It is interesting, of course, that the serpent was allowed in the Garden. I have done studies on this in the past. God would not have allowed the serpent to be there if Adam and Eve did not have the means to defeat him. This means they drifted in their walk with God to some degree and their resultant spiritual weakness made them vulnerable to the serpent’s conniving subtle attack. If they had done the spiritual work to keep their relationship with God strong and their own relationship strong the serpent would have been unable to deceive Eve and Eve would not have deceived Adam.

              The Lord Jesus teaches us that the enemy never takes a day off. This means we must never take a day off. While it is not easy to become and remain strong disciples, it is the only way to also stay strong successful spiritual warriors. Individual Christians will either defeat the enemy or be defeated by him. We increase our odds of success tremendously by doing what we must to get strong and stay strong. The Lord needs us to be the best we can be for Him.

              Blessings

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  2. The old sermon points about sin are so true. “Sin will take you further than you want to go, and keep you longer than you want to stay.”

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